About

ARTIST BIO

Jasmine Lee
李蕊文

Jasmine Lee is a community artist local to Boston, MA. She graduated from Tufts University with a double major in American Studies and Community Health and double minor in Chinese and Asian American Studies. Her education is grounded by her own lived experiences as a survivor in Boston, Massachusetts. She grew up with a single mother and brother in the Charlestown projects and Boston Chinatown. She has devoted her life to tackling issues in her own community. As a Visual Arts major at Boston Arts Academy, she was involved in Asian American issues through the arts, academics and the Asian American Club. As the Vice-President of Tufts Asian American Alliance, she addressed Asian American issues on and off campus through education, student organizing, arts and events.

Her political activism has expanded through her work in different Asian American organizations at the local and national level such as Project ADAPT, Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center, Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance and Asian American Women’s Political Initiative. She is passionate about combatting Asian American women’s issues, domestic violence, health inequities and racism through visual arts, public health, positive youth development and community organizing.

Her art is a space to combat issues with her community. As the Art Director of R Visions for Chinatown and lead artist, she has worked with community members, local artists, nonprofit organizations, institutions and the Boston Art Commission to raise awareness and organized collective actions around the affordable housing crisis in Boston Chinatown. As one of the few Asian American women artists featured in the nation’s first gallery for Artists Against Police Brutality, her “Asians4BlackLives” piece raises questions about where Asian America stands in the conversations about race and Black Lives. Through her own artwork, she continues to draw inspiration from her experiences, communities of color, conversations and representations involving Asian American women issues, racism and health inequities.

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